Is Outrage a Christian Value?

bernardino_mei_italian_sienese_-_christ_cleansing_the_temple_-_google_art_projectIs outrage a Christian value? Maybe it depends on what we’re outraged about. In the current political climate, it seems the entire nation is outraged—or at least a very vocal portion. I’ve seen post after post urging us to “stay outraged” until things go our way. But is outrage a good thing? When is outrage appropriate?

It depends on what we mean by outrage. So that we’re all on the same page, let’s see how the dictionary defines it:

  1. An act of wanton cruelty or violence; any gross violation of law or decency.
  2. Anything that strongly offends, insults, or affronts the feelings.
  3. A powerful feeling of resentment or anger aroused by something perceived as an injury, insult, or injustice.

Synonyms include: indignation, fury, anger, rage, disapproval, wrath, and resentment.

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Should I Say Something?

As I’m sure you’ve noticed, it’s open season on conservative Christians. Over the past year I’ve “unfollowed” a number of Facebook so-called friends because I got tired of being attacked. I know that none of it was personal, but it still hurt. Deciding that I don’t need this kind of negativity in my life, I stopped exposing myself to it.

But then I started wondering. When is it appropriate to speak up?

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Like Satire? Read the Babylon Bee

How easily are you offended?

Are you like the students at the University of Missouri (and other universities) who demanded an “offense-free zone”—a place on campus where their tender sensibilities are protected? Or can you handle a bit of mud coming your way?

Everyone is so concerned about avoiding offense, that political correctness has reached new heights. In the land of the free, we’ve lost the freedom to have a differing opinion.

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How to Say “You’re Forgiven”

Last time I wrote about how to say “I’m sorry.” Even if all our relationships are going great right now, I’m sure there will come a time when it’s very important that we know how to apologize.

But what happens when the shoe is on the other foot, and someone is apologizing to us? What happens when they ask for forgiveness—and maybe we’re not quite willing to forgive?

As important as it is to acknowledge our guilt and repent both to God and to the people we’ve hurt, it is equally essential to let go of the wrongs others have done to us.

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